Nerf SuperMAXX 750

SuperMAXX 750 Nerf Gun

The Nerf SuperMAXX 750 is a very nice Nerf gun, especially for its time. Though it’s somewhat dated now, the SuperMAXX 750 combines great range (47 feet) and near pinpoint accuracy.

The major drawback to the SuperMAXX 750 is that it’s a pump gun. As with all pump guns, it has a lackluster rate of fire. However, the SuperMAXX 750 doesn’t penalize you too badly in that area, as it only requires five pumps to effectively prime.

It also would have been nice if Nerf had attached a couple spare ammo slots somewhere on the SuperMAXX 750, but alas. That’s why God invented pockets.

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Nerf Warthog

Nerf Warthog

In its day, the Nerf Warthog was one of the best dart blasters on the market, and it is still pretty desirable for collectors & modders alike.

The Warthog is a spring blaster that simultaneously shoots two darts up to 35 feet with surprisingly good accuracy. Now, as I’ve said before, I really don’t like the Nerf blasters that have animal features, but the Warthog is an exception. The teeth may not add any functionality, but they look pretty cool and they’re unobtrusive.

If you happen across the Nerf Warthog at a yard sale you should definitely pick it up.

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Nerf Secret Shot 2

Nerf Secret Shot 2

The Nerf Secret Shot 2 is a big upgrade from the original Secret Shot. It’s so much of an upgrade, in fact, that it’s almost silly that these guns share the same name.

Whereas the original Secret Shot used a spring firing mechanism, the Secret Shot 2 is an air blaster. It takes about eight pumps to fully prime the weapon, and for a single shot it really pays off, but the downside of course is that you have to pump eight times between every round.

It can still be a lot of fun to play with the Secret Shot, but there’s really no reason to buy one now when you can make very basic modifications to the Nite Finder and reach the same distance with a spring loaded gun.

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Nerf Switchfire

Nerf Switchfire

The Nerf Switchfire is a fantastic Nerf gun — that is, if your idea of a fantastic Nerf gun is one with attachments that will launch off and kill someone with no warning.

The idea behind the Switchfire is that you can switch the attachments on the barrel, choosing between making the gun a missile launcher or a ball launcher. Hmm…how to pick. Both missiles and balls are known for their sad accuracy and mediocre range, so you know what, just pick one.

Or pick neither, because this is one of the rarest Nerf guns out there. Why, you ask? Well, remember what I said about the attachments launching off and hurting people? That’s true. Nerf pulled the Switchfire from shelves after it became something of a legal liability.

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Nerf SuperMAXX 350

Nerf SuperMAXX 350

Aside from the more contemporary look, the Nerf SuperMAXX 350 is pretty much identical to the SuperMAXX 250, and that’s too bad.

Like its predecessor, the SuperMAXX 350 suffers from lackluster range (~23 feet). There really isn’t any reason to buy this Nerf blaster unless you’re a collector, as there are a schlew of blasters this size that will give you considerably more bang for your buck.

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Nerf Rapid Fire 20

Nerf Rapid Fire 20

The Nerf Rapid Fire 20 is incredibly fun to play with thanks to its immensely satisfying Gatling gun action. Just load the Rapid Fire with 20 darts, prime it (20 pumps), and fire all 20 rounds in less than 3 seconds.

One of the cool features of the Rapid Fire 20 is that you can toggle between automatic and single fire modes. In single fire mode you can either fire the shots off one at a time with individual trigger presses, or hold the trigger down for a slower version of the automatic mode (it’ll take you about 11-12 seconds to unload all 20 rounds).

The Nerf Rapid Fire 20 has a range of about 20 feet (I’m sensing a recurring theme), which might sound low, but it keeps the gun from being overpowered compared to other Nerf guns. Balance is important, after all, and it’s easy to forgive the range when you can blast off 20 darts in 3 seconds. That’s just awesome.

Of course, one of the big pains when you have a gun that blows through rounds like the Nerf Rapid Fire 20 does is that you’re going to spend a lot of time gathering your darts, reloading and priming. This is not unique to this Nerf gun, though. Other rapid fire blasters like the Vulcan and Raider face the same problem, but in my opinion, having to reload frequently is a fine tradeoff.

The priming pump on the Rapid Fire is prone to breaking if you aren’t careful. As with all pump guns, slow steady pumps are best. Erratic pumps (as younger kids are prone to do) will wear out and possibly break the pump. Just be careful and your Rapid Fire will have a long life.

If you’re looking for a unique Nerf gun that will make your friends run for cover and hide (for at least 3 seconds), you’ll have a lot of fun with the Rapid Fire 20.

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Nerf Secret Strike AS-1

Nerf N-Strike Secret Strike AS-1

The Nerf Secret Strike is a tiny little Nerf gun with a solid amount of firepower for its size.

The packaging on the Secret Strike claims it can shoot up to 30 feet,which is true if you feel like priming ten times. Seeing as I’mimpatient, I usually prime about 7 times and shoot closer to 25 feet, which really is remarkable for a tiny little Nerf gun like this.

A lot of people seem to have issues with the Secret Strike not working at all, and I would imagine that almost every one of these problems can be attributed to over pumping. Do *not* exceed ten pumps, or you risk stretching out the bladder. Once that’s done, there’s nothing you can do — your new toy is shot and you’ll need to buy a new one. All pump-priming guns like the Secret Strike and Magstrike have this problem — it’s just natural given the technology, and is in no way a defect. So be careful and you’ll be alright.

I’m not 100% sure, but I think that the N-Strike Secret Strike blaster is the first Nerf gun to come with a belt clip. Now, Nerf, I obviously enjoy your products or I wouldn’t have made this site, but if I saw anyone walking around in a public place with a Secret Strike attached to their belt…well…I’d sneak up behind them, pull mine out of my pocket, and shoot them in the back of the head — because this thing is awesome and the world would be better if everyone had one.

In closing, the Nerf Secret Strike is a fantastic little blaster that you can carry around in your pocket. However, if you’re looking for a meatier gun with more versatility, you might want to give the Raider or Vulcan a try.

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Nerf SuperMAXX 5000

Nerf SuperMAXX 5000

Like virtually all Nerf weapons that fire multiple types of ammo, the Nerf SuperMAXX 5000 does a decent job at a number of things, but it doesn’t do anything particularly well.

The SuperMAXX 5000 can fire balls, arrows and darts. Unfortunately, it fires both balls and arrows with lackluster range and accuracy, so there really isn’t any reason to use those weapon attachments.

That leaves you with a dart blaster, and, well, there are much better dart blasters on the market. Unless you’re a collector, there really isn’t any reason to buy the Nerf SuperMAXX 5000.

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Nerf Nite Finder

Nerf Nite Finder

The Nerf Nite Finder is one of the best Nerf guns made in a long time.

Out of the box, the Nite Finder shoots darts about 35 feet with very good accuracy. If you’re into modding, replacing the barrel, removing the air restrictors and replacing the spring can easily double the range. Unbelievable for such a small Nerf blaster.

The Nite Finder was named for its little “laser” sight. The laser is accurate from about 15 feet, but it’s unpredictable beyond that (darts start to drop after that). It isn’t a horrible idea to remove it altogether if you have no use for it, as that cuts the weight of the gun almost in half.

Regardless, the Nerf Nite Finder is arguably the best Nerf pistol ever made. Its range and accuracy are exceptional, and the price point couldn’t get any better ($6!).

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Nerf Elimination Game

Nerf Elimination Game

The Nerf Elimination Game is a pretty cool product. Unlike most Nerf sets where you’re given a gun and a few darts and thenyou’re expected to make your own fun, the Nerf Elimination Game actuallyhas rules.

The Elimination Game package comes with four tiny little Nerf guns called “eliminators.” It’s easy to take one look at the size of the guns and write them off  right away, but don’t let their small size fool you — these things pack a nice little punch (20-25 feet).

This is how the game works:

Each player is given the name of one other person to hunt down, so that each person is both a target and a hunter. If you shoot your target, that player gives you the name of their target, and that is your new target. The game continues until there are only two people left, and believe me when I say that it can get very intense very quickly. The Elimination Game is great to play inside, and it really shines in close quarters.

The Nerf Elimination Game is really quite a bit of fun to play, especially as you learn the importance of accuracy and ammo conservation (an art that gets lost sometimes with the rapid-fire tendency of many Nerf guns like the Vulcan and Raider).

All in all, if you’re looking for a game that you can play with your friends of kids on a Saturday night, you can’t go wrong with the Nerf Elimination Game.

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